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Item 1-Always write down your first name and first initial of your last name along with the title of the song, disc and track number for the KJ. KJs usually have enough to do just making you sound as good as possible to be taking time to look up your information. Your name and last name initial assists the KJ in making certain that a singer is included in each rotation, not leaving someone out because there are 3 'Michael's and 2 'Kim's present that night.

Item 2- You won't be called after the same person every time. Not only do new singers have to be integrated into the 'rotation', but if the same order would result in 4 slow songs in a row you can't blame the KJ for trying to make it a little livelier by altering the order a little.

Item 3- In fact, it's a good idea (if your KJ permits it like I do) to put in a request for a slow song and an energetic, if not fast, song at the same time. Do not be surprised if the KJ picks the one that fits the flow of the show best. Besides, even high quality slow songs are easy by comparison with a high grade fast song. Spread your wings a little!

Item 3- This is one of the most difficult for the average singer to grasp. If you put in a request for a song and perform it, do not expect to get back on stage with your group song that's also in the rotation. It's not fair for everyone who, like you, is waiting to sing to look up and see you on stage when you just sang three songs ago. Try not to put your KJ in the position of having to delay your group until the next time your name is due to be called in order to avoid this faux pas.

Item 4- Do not hold the microphone like the "rap"guys do, with your hand completely around the ball of the mic. It cuts down on the sound reaching the mic's active element and changes the tone to something akin to a howling banshee. The rap guys are trying to make their voices sound like they're in a box. That's not what you want! Besides, they have custom tone controls (equalization) to offset what their mic technique is lacking, you don't.